At Simon Peter’s house

Each time your child takes a Bible Quest in Guardians of Ancora, there’s a collection of activities, games and things to make and do together, all of which extend and expand the in-game fun beyond the app. Look through this collection and choose one or more ideas to help your family discover more about ‘At Simon Peter’s House’.

Here are some great questions to start you chatting about any Bible Quest:

  • What sort of thing has this Bible Quest reminded you of, that you knew before?
  • What new things have you discovered, as you’ve played this Bible Quest?
  • Is there anything you’re going to keep thinking about, from the Quest?

New activity ideas are added for each Bible Quest, as well several collections of activities about prayer, stories and so on. Look out for more Family Activity downloads, as your child plays more Bible Quests.

A quick introduction to spiritual styles

Family activities from Guardians of Ancora are devised to inspire varied ways of knowing God:  four distinct avenues for connecting with him through word, emotion, symbol, and action. These ‘spiritual styles’ are broad approaches to spirituality and faith, through which children experience God and make sense of their lives in the world around them.

If you want to find out more about spiritual styles, this article is a helpful introduction to a fascinating topic:

http://www.faithformationlearningexchange.net/uploads/5/2/4/6/5246709/saturation_spirituality-creating_environmentsthatnurtureallchildren_-_csinos.pdf

Fever

Bible link

Mark 1:29–31

What you need:

a household thermometer

What you do:

Suggest your child takes the temperature of each person in your household, starting with themselves.

They might want to make a chart of each person’s temperature.

Talk a little about what a fever is (do a quick online search if you’re not sure),  explaining the reaction of the body to something being wrong.

Suggest a prayer such as ‘Thanks for our bodies and the systems in them that keep us well, and show us when we need help.’

This activity will encourage children with symbol- and action-centred approaches to knowing God.

 

Multigenerational family

Bible link

Mark 1:29–31

What you need:

the Bible words of Mark 1:29–31

pen and paper

What you do:

Challenge your child with this puzzle: Can you work out how many people probably lived in Simon Peter’s house?

Encourage them to read the Bible story again and draw a stick figure for each person mentioned who lived in Simon Peter’s house. Looking at how these people were related, you can make a good guess at who else might have lived in the house. For example: if Peter lives there, and so does his mother-in-law, Peter must have also had a wife.

Repeat the challenge with ‘Who lives in our home?’ and ‘Who is in our family?’

This activity will interest children with a word-centred approach to knowing God.

 

Grandparent power

Bible link

Mark 1:29–31

What you do:

In this story, the grandma in the family is really missed when she’s sick, because she has important jobs in the family. When she is made well again, she uses her new ‘granny-power’ to serve Jesus.

Spend a little time helping your child understand different family relationships, including how the same person can be, for example, a mother, a grandmother, a mother-in-law and so on.

Chances are there are grannies you know in your neighbourhood who use their ‘granny-power’ to help others and serve Jesus. There may be one in your family! Keep your eyes open and see if you can meet some.

This activity will motivate children with an action-centred approach to knowing God.

 

Supergran!

Bible link

Mark 1:29–31

What you need:

the creative hub area of Guardians of Ancora or art materials

What you do:

In this story, the grandma in the family is really missed when she’s sick, because she has important jobs in the family. When she is made well again, she uses her new ‘supergran’ power to serve Jesus.

Help your child understand how family roles work. Does your child have any grandparents? How do parents and grandparents relate? How do mothers and mothers-in-law fit in the family? How can one person have several of these roles? Work them out for your own family.

Suggest to your child that they use their creativity to invent a ‘supergran’ character or symbol.

This activity can help us think about the kind of things a ‘supergran’ might use her power for and why Jesus was keen to heal the granny/mother-in-law in Peter’s house.

This activity will encourage children with symbol- and emotion-centred approaches to knowing God.

 

Best mates

Bible link

Mark 1:29–31

What you need:

photos or drawings of your friends

What you do:

Together with your child, check back over the story in Mark 1:29–31.

Notice the names of Jesus’ mates (four ‘disciples’ or ‘followers’ are mentioned).

Notice that when one of them has something bad happen in their family, they tell Jesus about it.

Make a photo montage (either on the computer, or with scissors and glue) of your mates. Keep it somewhere handy as a reminder to tell Jesus when things are going badly for your mates or their families.

This activity will inspire children with a symbol-centred approach to knowing God.

Meeting places

Bible link

Mark 1:29–31

What you need:

observation skills

What you do:

The story in Mark 1:29–31 starts as Jesus and his friends are leaving the meeting place in the village, the synagogue. This was a place where people met to hear the ancient stories of the Jewish people, talk about them together and pray – kind of a cross between church, a cultural club and a book group.

If you are passing a meeting place or a church in your local community with your child, and it’s open, drop in and look at the symbols and art and furnishings.

This activity will encourage children with an emotion-centred approach to knowing God.

When I was your age…

Bible link

Mark 1:29–31

What you need:

memories

conversation

What you do:

Jesus heals the granny/mother-in-law in Simon Peter’s household.

Grandparents often have amazing stories to tell about their adventurous lives. Next time your child sees their grandparent(s), prompt them to ask for a story.

If you don’t have your own grandparents close by, there may be an older person you know well, in your neighbourhood, who has stories to tell (such as what life was like before tablet computers!).

This activity will encourage children with word- and emotion-centred approaches to knowing God.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Send this to a friend