Jesus and Jairus

Each time your child takes a Bible Quest in Guardians of Ancora, there’s a collection of activities, games and things to make and do together, all of which extend and expand the in-game fun beyond the app. Look through this collection and choose one or more ideas to help your family discover more about ‘Jesus and Jairus’.

Here are some great questions to start you chatting about any Bible Quest:

  • What sort of thing has this Bible Quest reminded you of, that you knew before?
  • What new things have you discovered, as you’ve played this Bible Quest?
  • Is there anything you’re going to keep thinking about, from the Quest?

New activity ideas are added for each Bible Quest, as well several collections of activities about prayer, stories and so on. Look out for more Family Activity downloads, as your child plays more Bible Quests.

A quick introduction to spiritual styles

Family activities from Guardians of Ancora are devised to inspire varied ways of knowing God:  four distinct avenues for connecting with him through word, emotion, symbol, and action. These ‘spiritual styles’ are broad approaches to spirituality and faith, through which children experience God and make sense of their lives in the world around them.

If you want to find out more about spiritual styles, this article is a helpful introduction to a fascinating topic:

http://www.faithformationlearningexchange.net/uploads/5/2/4/6/5246709/saturation_spirituality-creating_environmentsthatnurtureallchildren_-_csinos.pdf

Talking about illness

Bible link

Luke 8:40–56

What you do:

Sickness is part of every family’s life at some time. It’s a normal part of life that comes from sharing the planet with a lot of other interesting life forms. Unfortunately we don’t get along with all of the bacteria, viruses, insects, animals and plants that we share the planet with, so sickness is pretty normal.

But just because it’s normal, it doesn’t mean it isn’t hard.

Talk with your child about how, when someone is unwell, it’s a great time to show kindness. Help them understand how amazing our bodies are in keeping us healthy most of the time.

This is also a good time to remind your child of times when they or others they know have been sick before, and to think about what has helped them feel better.

This activity will inspire children with a symbol-centred approach to knowing God.

First-century medicine

Bible link

Luke 8:40–56

What you need:

www.youtube.com

What you do:

Medical advice in the first century was sometimes strange, and sometimes scary. Sometimes it made things worse, not better.

To get some more background on this story, your child might like to find out about some of the ancient medicines popular in Jesus’ time. In Horrible Histories: Historical Hospital, the characters of Dr Isis and the Roman doctor both feature medicine that was practised in Jesus’ time.

This activity will motivate children with an action-centred approach to knowing God.

Graphs

Bible link

Luke 8:40–56

What you need:

the Bible words from Luke 8:40–56 (use a printed Bible or download from www.biblegateway.com or find the words at the Timeline in Guardians of Ancora)

What you do:

Read the story again with your child and make a tally of how many times female characters are mentioned in the story.

In the culture of this story, women and girls were not as highly regarded as men and boys. Talk this over with your child.

Do the statistics you have just tallied demonstrate this? Or do you think that perhaps Jesus thought differently?

If your child is into graphs and charts, suggest they try this:

  •        Make a graph showing the number of times female words or names are mentioned and the number of times male words or names are mentioned in the story. (Include words like “his/her”, “father/daughter” and “girl/man”.)
  •        Make a column totalling all the female words and another totalling all the male words. Compare how many times females are mentioned by name with how many times males are mentioned by name.

This activity will interest children with a word-centred approach to knowing God.

Prayer words

Bible link

Luke 8:40–56

What you need:

the Bible words from Luke 8:40–56 (use a printed Bible or download from www.biblegateway.com or find the words at the Timeline in Guardians of Ancora)

What you do:

This story is a great one to remember when your child is asking questions about illnesses, or if they are curious about the roles of females in faith. The story doesn’t explain how Jesus makes the two people well, but it does show us how he treats them.

Your child (especially if she’s a girl) might have noticed that this is a story that includes several women.

Re-read the story slowly with your child and, as you go, suggest that they make a list of how Jesus treats the woman and the daughter.

Here are some ideas to get you started: respect; kindness; compassion; individual attention; and he doesn’t give up hope for them, even when others do.

If you know some people who are unwell, you can pray for them together, knowing how Jesus would treat them, as he did the sick people in the story.

If your child is into creativity and visual art, suggest that they make a set of prayer cards, writing one of each of the things from your list of ways that Jesus treated sick people on each card.

When it comes to praying for someone, choose from the set of cards.

This activity will encourage children with an emotion-centred approach to knowing God.

Acting the “-ing” words

Bible link

Luke 8:40–56

What you need:

the Bible words from Luke 8:40–56 (use a printed Bible or download from www.biblegateway.com or find the words at the Timeline in Guardians of Ancora)

What you do:

Pool the theatrical talent of your household to get to know this part of the Bible better.

Go through the story and take note of all the words that end with “-ing”. (There are 12, and they are all action words, if you are using the Contemporary English Version of the Bible.)

Write each of these words on a separate piece of paper and put them all into a bowl or a heap.  Either do this together, or suggest to your child to get this bit prepared in advance.

With the group assembled, each take turns at drawing out one word and miming that action. After practising all of the actions in this random way, re-read the story and mime along at the appropriate “-ing” words.

This activity will motivate children with an action-centred approach to knowing God.

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