Jesus and the Roman Officer

Each time your child takes a Bible Quest in Guardians of Ancora, there’s a collection of activities, games and things to make and do together, all of which extend and expand the in-game fun beyond the app. Look through this collection and choose one or more ideas to help your family discover more about ‘Jesus and the Roman Officer’.

Here are some great questions to start you chatting about any Bible Quest:

  • What sort of thing has this Bible Quest reminded you of, that you knew before?
  • What new things have you discovered, as you’ve played this Bible Quest?
  • Is there anything you’re going to keep thinking about, from the Quest?

New activity ideas are added for each Bible Quest, as well several collections of activities about prayer, stories and so on. Look out for more Family Activity downloads, as your child plays more Bible Quests.

A quick introduction to spiritual styles

Family activities from Guardians of Ancora are devised to inspire varied ways of knowing God:  four distinct avenues for connecting with him through word, emotion, symbol, and action. These ‘spiritual styles’ are broad approaches to spirituality and faith, through which children experience God and make sense of their lives in the world around them.

If you want to find out more about spiritual styles, this article is a helpful introduction to a fascinating topic:

http://www.faithformationlearningexchange.net/uploads/5/2/4/6/5246709/saturation_spirituality-creating_environmentsthatnurtureallchildren_-_csinos.pdf

Putting it into practice

Bible link

Luke 7:1–10

What you need:

the Bible words from Luke 7:1–10 (use a printed Bible or download from www.biblegateway.com or find the words at the Timeline in Guardians of Ancora)

art materials: coloured paper, pens, scissors

What you do:

In this Bible quest, Jesus heals a Roman officer’s servant. But the Romans were the enemy, so why would Jesus help?

Here are a couple of snippets from Jesus’ teaching (which had just finished in the previous chapter):

  •        “Love your enemies; do good to those who hate you.”
  •        “Do not judge.”
  •        “God is kind to the ungrateful and the wicked.”

Re-read the Bible story with your child and, together, look for examples of how Jesus’ actions matched his teaching.

Talk about the times when we could put Jesus’ teaching into practice.

Encourage your child to write Jesus’ teaching on some colourful paper and make speech bubbles. Stick them on the fridge as a reminder.

This activity will interest children with a word-centred approach to knowing God.

Soldiers, slaves and sickness

Bible link

Luke 7:1–10

What you do:

Many stories in the Bible are set in difficult times. This story includes an enemy army officer, a servant and sickness. Remind your child that there are still places in the world today where these three things (soldiers in the streets, slavery and sickness) are common.

Say something like: “Let’s look out for examples of these things in the news, and try and remember to pray for those situations. From the story, we know that Jesus cares about them all.”

It can be really helpful for children to meet with someone who is willing to talk about these things. They are often aware of difficult and dangerous situations, but they may not always have the words to express their feelings.

You don’t need to have all the answers: it’s enough for children to feel that they can share these things with you.

This activity will encourage children with an emotion-centred approach to knowing God.

Tough guys

Bible link

Luke 7:1–10

What you need:

art materials: paper and something to draw with

What you do:

Our children are surrounded by “tough guy” images. The stories of Jesus show him meeting lots of different types of people: men and women, rich and poor, locals and visitors, sick and powerful.

In this Bible story, Jesus helps out a Roman soldier, a commander in the emperor’s forces. He was the ultimate “tough guy”, and he had the power to order everyone around.

Keep an eye out for the next time your child is looking at a “tough guy” or a superhero. Most children come into contact with the “tough guy” image pretty often.

Sometimes, our children need to be the “tough guy” in order to deal with their fears. This activity provides an opportunity for kids to identify themselves or others with this image, and to recognise Jesus’ friendship and help for everyone.

Draw a cartoon of your own ultimate “tough guy”. As you do, remember that even tough guys need help sometimes! This one knew that Jesus is always ready to help.

This activity will inspire children with a symbol-centred approach to knowing God.

Pause for applause

Bible link  

Luke 7:1–10

What you do:

Every household has chores to be done, and most of us don’t have servants to do them! Make it a habit in your household to show appreciation for chores that are done.

This can be simple and natural, or if you’re a more extroverted household you might like to start a tradition of calling “Pause to applause”! Name a home-job and who has done it – to be followed by enthusiastic cheering and applause in the household.

This activity will motivate children with an action-centred approach to knowing God.

Roman slaves

Bible link

Luke 7:1–10

What you do:

Slaves did lots of different tasks in the Roman Empire.

Watch some clips together from the Horrible Histories series “Rotten Romans” (available on www.youtube.com), which give a humorous take on history.

This activity will inspire children with a symbol-centred approach to knowing God.