Jesus Feeds a Crowd

Each time your child takes a Bible Quest in Guardians of Ancora, there’s a collection of activities, games and things to make and do together, all of which extend and expand the in-game fun beyond the app. Look through this collection and choose one or more ideas to help your family discover more about ‘Jesus Feeds a Crowd’.

Here are some great questions to start you chatting about any Bible Quest:

  • What sort of thing has this Bible Quest reminded you of, that you knew before?
  • What new things have you discovered, as you’ve played this Bible Quest?
  • Is there anything you’re going to keep thinking about, from the Quest?

New activity ideas are added for each Bible Quest, as well several collections of activities about prayer, stories and so on. Look out for more Family Activity downloads, as your child plays more Bible Quests.

A quick introduction to spiritual styles

Family activities from Guardians of Ancora are devised to inspire varied ways of knowing God:  four distinct avenues for connecting with him through word, emotion, symbol, and action. These ‘spiritual styles’ are broad approaches to spirituality and faith, through which children experience God and make sense of their lives in the world around them.

If you want to find out more about spiritual styles, this article is a helpful introduction to a fascinating topic:

http://www.faithformationlearningexchange.net/uploads/5/2/4/6/5246709/saturation_spirituality-creating_environmentsthatnurtureallchildren_-_csinos.pdf

Alphabet reading

Bible link

John 6:1–15,25–59

What you need:

the Bible words from John 6:1–15,25–59 (use a printed Bible or download from www.biblegateway.com or find the words at the Timeline in Guardians of Ancora)

What you do:

This story can be read aloud, having some fun with words beginning with different letters. You can do this to fill in time anywhere – bookmark the link to this story (and any other favourites your child reads in Guardians of Ancora).

To start with, explain that the “buzz” letter in the story is the letter “B”. One person reads the story aloud while the other(s) listen out for any words that begin with the letter “B”. Each time they hear a “B-word” they should call out the word loudly.

Once you have read the whole story with “B” buzzwords, repeat with other letters. (“F” and “P” work well.)

After reading the story a few times like this, see how many of the buzzwords you can list together.

The stories of the Bible were first of all told out loud for a long time before they were written down. People had great memories, and they also had different ways of remembering the stories, like using buzzwords such as these.

This activity will interest children with a word-centred approach to knowing God.

Headlines

Bible link

John 6:1–15,25–59

What you need:

the Bible words from John 6:1–15,25–59 (use a printed Bible or download from www.biblegateway.com or find the words at the Timeline in Guardians of Ancora)

What you do:

When Jesus fed a crowd of more than 5,000 people it was a very public story! Chat with your child about the way headlines are used to grab attention. Ask your child: “If you were the editor of the news, how would you headline this story?”

Read through the text together and think about “headline” options. Here are some suggestions to get you started:

  •        “Food crisis fixed”
  •        “Jesus avoids crowd fandom”
  •        “Bread for everyone”
  •        “Little boy, large lunch”
  •        “Jesus – king material?”
  •        “‘God wants us to have faith,’ says Jesus”
  •        “‘Faith not food,’ says Jesus”

Now you have your headlines, how could you use them? What about creating your own newspaper, or you could video each other talking about the story or acting it out?

This activity will interest children with a word-centred approach to knowing God.

Creative picnic

Bible link

John 6:1–15,25–59  

What you need:

various food items

What you do:

With a bit of encouragement, your child might enjoy organising a creative picnic or weekend meal at home to retell this story. Help them brainstorm some ideas and then gather a few foods that symbolise parts of the story.

For example:

  •        Boat: a bread roll “boat” sliced open with a cheese-slice triangle sail fixed on with a toothpick;
  •        Crowd: a packet of Jelly Babies;
  •        Bread and fish: bread rolls and tinned tuna or sardines;
  •        Grass: alfalfa sprouts.

Let them organise and present the foods,  retell the story and then enjoy eating the food!

This activity will inspire children with a symbol-centred approach to knowing God.

Free rice

Bible link

John 6:1–15,25–59

What you need:

freerice.com

What you do:

Freerice.com is a website on which you can test your word, maths, art or foreign language knowledge. For each answer you get right, ten grains of rice are donated to the United Nations World Food Programme. It doesn’t sound like a lot, but over the past seven years millions of people have been fed through this programme.

You can choose your topic and level to play. There are levels of increasing difficulty, so everyone in the household can play and contribute to making food fairer around the world.

When Jesus is in charge of the food, everyone gets a fair share, no one goes hungry and there are even leftovers! This is a picture of how God wants the world to be. In this Bible story, Jesus’ disciples, or followers, help with the job of making sure everyone gets enough food. This is one example of what it means to be a follower of Jesus.

At times your child might express concern or distress about the problem of hunger or poverty in the world. When they do, encourage them to use the computer to do some freerice.com donating!

This activity will motivate children with an action-centred approach to knowing God.

Basic bread

Bible link

John 6:1–15,25–59  

What you need:

bread and topping

What you do:

Bread is a “basic”. It’s not fancy food – it’s just a good filler for everyone.  It’s a simple “bring along” food. In the Bible story it's a child who brings along the bread. You can add fancy toppings – jam, honey or cheese (in the story it was fish) – but it’s the bread that fills the basic hunger.

Suggest to your child a “Basic bread” family and friends picnic. Let them organise a simple picnic of bread rolls and one kind of topping (some sliced cheese, a jar of spread or a tub of dip).

Enjoy keeping it really simple, and take the opportunity to be thankful for having the basics.

This activity will motivate children with an action-centred approach to knowing God.

Giving thanks and sharing

Bible link

John 6:1–15,25–59  

What you do:

When it comes to the point of actually feeding the people in this story, Jesus takes the bread in his hands, gives thanks for it and then shares it with others. This was a tradition that people in his culture did before eating.

Do you have any mealtime traditions? Chat with your child about these.

Maybe there were mealtime traditions you had when you were young that your child doesn't know about. Take this chance to share a bit of family history!

If you don’t have any mealtime traditions, perhaps your child might invent one.

Maybe your household could try the same tradition as Jesus:

  •        Hold the food in your hands (in a container!).
  •        Say some words of thanks, eg: “We are thankful.”
  •        Pass the food to someone else.

This activity will inspire children with a symbol-centred approach to knowing God.